2015.08.28 Friday 14:46

Democracy 70 years after the war's end

  As Japan greeted the 70th anniversary of its defeat in World War II in the midst of growing opposition to the government-proposed security legislation, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe must have realized that he has to run his administration under a variety of constraints.

 

One of such constraints is international opinion. Initially, Prime Minister Abe appeared to be resolved to issue a war anniversary statement that reflects his own perception of Japan’s modern history. However, it was obvious that a right-wing viewpoint of history, which tends to deny Japan’s responsibility for its aggression and colonial rule, was not to be acceptable not just to Asian countries but also to Western nations. For Japan to live as a member of the international community, the prime minister could not choose to publicize a self-righteous perception of history. As a result, the statement that Abe made on Aug. 14 deviated from his own personal sentiments and its message became weak because of its lengthy text. The prime minister did use an expression that apparently reflected his own thought — that Japan must not let its future generations be predestined to apologize for that war, with which they have nothing to do. He may have wanted to dispel the chagrin at having had to refer in the statement to the wartime aggression and the “women behind the battlefields whose honor and dignity were severely injured.” As long as he and right-wing politicians close to him continue to try to deny that Japan had waged a war of aggression and justify its colonial rule, the new generations of Japanese will have to keep apologizing to the people of Asia. I wonder if the prime minister understands the logical structure of this problem.


Another — and even larger — constraint is the popular will. As long as Japan is a democracy, the acts of those in power will obviously be constrained by the will of the people. It was in fact an extraordinary situation that the prime minister, until just recently, did whatever he wanted on the strength of the strong popular approval ratings of his Cabinet. Abe might have preferred to paint the 70th war anniversary statement with his own colors if the approval ratings had stayed high. But he had no other choice but to take a low posture now that public criticism of his administration has gained momentum. And while he extended the Diet session through the end of September in order to secure enactment of the security legislation, he is reportedly ready to shelve the passage of his other controversial bills, including the one to exempt some office workers from work-hour regulations. This may indicate that the popular will is serving as a brake on the administration to some extent.


On July 1 last year, before Abe’s Cabinet made a decision the same month to justify Japan’s exercising the right to collective self-defense, I joined hands with other scholars in political science and constitutional law and launched a movement to protect constitutionalism — the Group for Constitutional Democracy. Its members are pushing the movement with a sense of crisis that a series of moves by the Abe administration threaten to destroy constitutionalism, which constrains political power with the Constitution. To be honest, the changes in public opinion since June this year went beyond our imagination. In prewar Japan, political parties used the term constitutionalism to oppose the dominance by bureaucrats and the oligarchy that ruled the country since the Meiji Restoration. After being pushed to oblivion for some time as postwar democracy prevailed, the term is back in circulation —triggered by the controversy over the security legislation.


 Our trial and error in pursuit of full democracy in this country over the past 20 years or so led us to rediscover the crude reality — that no other political party except the Liberal Democratic Party is yet capable of running the government. However, the LDP itself has lost the breadth and prudence that it used to possess, and is now dominated by politicians with little experience as lawmakers, whose words and actions border on those of right-wingers on the Internet sphere. And these lawmakers are trying to push through the Diet a set of bills that are labeled by a majority of constitutional scholars as unconstitutional.


Under such a situation, we may not have the luxury of advocating a system where political parties take turns running the government, but will need to return to the bottom line of constitutionalism, that is, putting a brake on political power by confining it in a certain frame. It is not that such a view is shared by citizens who take to the streets to voice opposition to the security legislation. But I am hopeful that the agenda of putting abrake on political power will gain sympathy and support from a broad range of citizens.


The movement for constitutionalism would not be sustained if it ends up being a game of whack-a-mole against arrogant leaders in power — a process that will be tiring for those who pursue the movement. We need to establish a custom in which those in power who ignore the Constitution will be severely punished by voters in elections. But that will also require creating an alternative political entity that can take the place of the LDP. I grew a bit tired after saying the same thing repeatedly ever since the Democratic Party of Japan lost power three years ago. Still I need to keep saying that. The opposition forces should work together to create a minimum set of agenda on important policy issues that can represent the energized citizens who are active in protecting the Constitution and peace. The Upper House election next year will be a crucial test for survival of constitutional democracy in this country.


Japan Times, August 26



2015.08.28 Friday 14:41

戦後70年のデモクラシー

 安倍晋三首相は、政権復帰以来の株価と支持率の上昇に支えられ、無人の野を行くがごとく、政策目標を実現してきた。しかし、安保法制に対する反対論が高まるなかで戦後70年の終戦の日を迎え、様々な制約の中で政権を運営させられていることを実感しているに違いない。


 1つの制約は、国際世論である。当初、安倍首相は自らの歴史観を盛り込んだ戦後70年談話を出すことに強い意欲を示していた。しかし、侵略や植民地支配を否定する右派的な歴史観は、アジアのみならず欧米からも受け入れられないことは明らかであった。日本が国際社会の中で生きて行くためには、首相が唯我独尊の歴史観を公表してはならない。安倍談話は首相個人の思いからはかけ離れたものとなり、長々しい文章のゆえにメッセージ性は薄くなった。


 首相は日本の次の世代に戦争について謝罪し続ける宿命を負わせたくないと、首相らしい表現を使った。侵略や女性の権利などに言及したことへの悔しさをここで晴らそうとしたのだろう。首相やその取り巻きの右派政治家が侵略を否定し、植民地支配を正当化する限り、次の世代の日本人はアジアの国民に謝罪を続けざるを得ない。この構図を首相は理解しているのだろうか。


 もう1つの、そしてより大きな制約は民意である。日本が民主主義国である以上、為政者が民意に制約されるのは当たり前である。今まで高い支持率の上におごってやりたい放題をしてきたことの方が異常であった。安倍政権が推進する安保法制はきわめて不出来な代物であり、国会審議における政府答弁は破綻している。首相は、衆議院の審議では集団的自衛権の行使の事例としてホルムズ海峡の機雷除去をあげていたが、それが荒唐無稽であることが明らかになると、参議院の審議では中国の脅威を強調し始めた。安保法制は日本の安全を確保するための手段ではなく、それ自体が目標である。日本社会や国民生活にかかわる実体的課題を後回しにして安保法制に狂奔する安倍政権には、国民の存在は目に入っていないようである。


 私は昨年71日の、集団的自衛権行使を正当化する閣議決定を前に、政治学や憲法学の研究者とともに立憲主義を擁護するための運動、立憲デモクラシーの会を結成した。戦後日本に定着した憲法9条の運用を安倍政権が閣議決定で変更することは、憲法による政治権力の制約という立憲主義を破棄するものだという危機感を持って運動をしてきた。今年の6月以降の世論の変化は、正直なところ想像を超えたものである。


 衆議院憲法審査会で3人の憲法学者が安保法制について憲法違反だと断言したことから、安保法制について異論を唱えたり反対したりすることは正しいのだという解放感が、メディアや関心を持つ市民の意間に広がった。66日に立憲デモクラシーの会が東京大学法学部の教室で、憲法学の泰斗、佐藤幸治京都大学名誉教授、樋口陽一東京大学名誉教授と石川健司東京大学教授による講演とシンポジウムを開催したところ、会場には教室の定員の倍を超える千五百人以上の市民が詰めかけた。会場の雰囲気は異様と言ってよいものであった。安保法制という道具が日本政治の土台を突き崩すのではないかという憂いが充満していたと私は思った。佐藤氏は直接安保法制には言及しなかったが、人類、そして日本人が苦闘の末に確立した立憲政治を今覆すことは許されないと、熱を込めて説いた。なお、この時の佐藤講演は『世界史の中の日本国憲法』(左右社)として刊行されている。


 立憲主義という言葉は、戦前の日本では藩閥や官僚による支配に対抗して、政党勢力が使ったシンボルであり、人口に膾炙した。しかし、権力の暴走を防ぐという消極的なメージで、民主主義よりも後退している感覚があり、戦後民主主義の中では、しばらく忘れられていた。今回の安保法制をめぐる議論を契機に、立憲主義という言葉が流布している。この20年ほど、我々は十全な民主主義を目指して試行錯誤を続けたが、自民党以外に政権の担い手がいないという身もふたもない現実を再発見しただけであった。しかも、その自民党はかつての幅広さや慎重さを失い、議員経験も浅い、ネトウヨと見まがう政治家が跳梁跋扈している。そして、憲法違反と言われる法案を無理押ししようとしている。


 こうなると、政権交代可能な民主政治などという贅沢を言わず、政治権力を一定の枠の中に収めるという立憲主義というレベルで歯止めをかける必要がある。安保法制に反対を叫ぶ市民の頭の中がこのように整理されているわけではないが、政治の暴走を止めるという課題には、市民の素朴な共感を得られるだろう。


 立憲民主主義を守るという運動を開始した者にとって、運動の広がりはうれしいことである。しかし、ある種の先取りした挫折感も覚える。何かの僥倖で安保法制の成立を阻止できたとしても、自民党が心を入れ替えるわけはない。安倍の次をにらんでいる候補者の中には、安倍と同類かもっと右寄りの政治家もいる。野党の支持は広がっているわけではなく、政権交代によって自民党政治に歯止めをかけることに期待が高まっているわけでもない。


 立憲主義の運動が、おごれる権力者に対するモグラ叩きになれば、運動する側も疲弊して長続きはしない。憲法を無視する権力者は選挙で国民に厳しく罰せられるという慣行を作り出す必要があるのだが、それには自民党に取って代わる政治主体を作り出さなければならない。3年前に民主党が下野して以来、同じことを言い続けていることには疲れを覚えるばかりであるが、やはり言い続けなければならない。憲法と平和を守れと動いている市民のエネルギーを受け止めるために、野党は重要な政策課題にかんする最小限綱領を作って、受け皿を作るべきである。来年の参議院選挙こそ、立憲民主政治の存続が問われる場面となる。


週刊東洋経済8月29日号


2015.08.24 Monday 14:39

民意の力

 民主政治とは国会の多数派が物事を決める仕組みだと思い込んでいる人々は、普通の市民が集会やデモをして声を出すことに冷笑的だ。そんなことをして何の意味があるのかとせせら笑う人もいるだろう。しかし、そんな民主主義理解は決定的に間違っている。

 安倍首相は国会会議を三か月以上も延長したにもかかわらず、安保法制以外の重要法案の成立を断念せざるを得なくなった。アベノミクスの新機軸とされた労働基準法改正や女性活躍に関する法案も成立のめどは立っていない。また、戦後七〇年談話についても、日本は偉かったと叫びたいという当初の意図はくじかれ、反省のポーズは示さざるをえなくなった。

 国会で与党が安定多数を持っているにもかかわらず、なぜ安倍首相は妥協や後退を余儀なくされるのか。それはひとえに民意の力の現れである。若者や女性が街頭に出て安保法制反対を訴え、それが多くの国民の共感を呼び、安保法制反対、安倍政権不支持は今や多数意見となった。世の中を客観的に見ることの苦手な安倍首相にさえ、今まで通りボクちゃんのしたいことを全部するわけにはいかないと感じさせたところに、民意の力が働いた。

 会期末まであと一か月、もっと民意を盛り上げよう。この国の主人公は誰か、ボクちゃんに思い知らせてやろう。


東京新聞8月23日


2015.08.17 Monday 14:37

歴史を繰り返すな

  安保法制を推進する人々は、これは戦争法案ではなく、日本の安全と平和を守るためだと主張する。もちろん、今の日本はわざわざ他国に戦争を仕掛けるような「ならず者国家」ではない。安倍首相をはじめ政府与党の政治家も、好き好んで戦争をする指導者ではないだろう。しかし、同盟国アメリカは、過去においてわざわざ他国に戦争を仕掛けた前歴がある。憲法上の歯止めを自分から進んで外せば、戦争に参加することを拒めなくなることを我々は心配しているのである。

 問題は、今の指導者に日本とは無関係な戦争から距離を置くという政治的判断ができるかどうかである。その点は極めて心もとない。今の自民党には、昔「国体明徴」を唱えて言論の自由を抑圧した独裁者と同類の政治家が複数存在する。また、個人の尊厳を否定し、国民は国家のために犠牲になるべきだと信じている、時代錯誤の政治家も存在する。最大の問題は、今の自民党にはそうした非常識な政治家を粛正する力がない点である。

 八月一五日をどう迎えたかは、政治家の見識を図る格好の尺度である。あの戦争を正しいと考え、国策の誤りについて反省する能力のない政治家に、これから戦争に参加するためのスイッチを預けることは、自殺行為である。歴史を顧みることは我々の安全の基礎である。


東京新聞8月16日


2015.08.10 Monday 17:54

七〇年宣言

  先日、近所の小学校で創立七〇年の子供宣言を出すという話を紹介した。その後、どんな宣言を出すかをめぐって紛糾が続いている。生徒会長のアベ君は、仲良しや学校一の秀才キタオカ君だけでなく、町内の長老ニシムロさんまで引っ張り出して、宣言文をめぐる検討会議を作った。

 キタオカ君は、昔の先輩たちが隣の学校の子供をいじめて迷惑をかけたことは事実なので、反省するという言葉を入れようと言った。にらみを利かせている大浜先生に、僕はアベ君には反対したんですよと言い訳したいのかと冷やかしたくもなるが、正しいことを言っているので、えらいねと褒めておこう。長老のニシムロさんは、以前経営していた会社で不正経理が発覚したとかで、過ちがあれば謝らなければねと言って去っていった。

 アベ君の応援団も黙っていない。一年生のムトー君は、生徒会長に続けとばかりに、喧嘩はしたくないというお兄さんたちに、それってわがままだ、喧嘩が始まったらみんな戦わなければと威勢のいいことを言い出した。

 アベ君は頑固だ。近所にペコペコ謝り続けていては、ボクたちはこの学校に誇りを持てない。ボクは未来のための宣言を出したいんだと、言い張る。中国の孟子という偉い人は、千万人と雖も我往かんと言ったよ。

 キミ、中国は嫌いじゃなかったの。


東京新聞8月9日


2015.08.03 Monday 17:56

Transformation of political culture in Japan

Discussions on the government-proposed security legislation have brought to the fore a clear polarization of political culture in Japan. One of the trends is anti-intellectualism. The other is civic culture pushing for democratization.


Anti-intellectualism has permeated not only movements that champion nationalism and part of the mass media but also the political circles. In the first place, the security legislation itself can be deemed as a product of anti-intellectualism. Many scholars of constitutional law and former chiefs of Cabinet Legislation Bureau declare that the security legislation violates the war-renouncing Constitution. But the government has been unable to give convincing rebuttals to their argument. Because Japan’s Self-Defense Forces are allowed to possess weapons only for the purpose of defending the nation, exercising the right to collective self-defense to defend another country is out of the question under the Constitution. In the Diet deliberations so far, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Defense Minister Gen Nakatani have not answered straight on the questions raised by lawmakers but instead spent their time dodging the questions.

In the cultural sphere, authors and politicians who do not hesitate to flaunt their anti-intellectualism continue to fuel discrimination and prejudice. Novelist Naoki Hyakuta, who was invited to speak at a gathering of Liberal Democratic Party lawmakers supposedly to discuss issues related to culture and arts, suggested that the two local dailies in Okinawa, which are critical of national government policies, must be shut down while LDP lawmakers trumpeted controlling TV reports by applying pressures on the sponsors of their programs. Some politicians and conservative journalists even tried to justify such remarks in the name of freedom of speech. Japan is a country where attempts to defame others through demagogy or negate freedom are condoned in the name of freedom of speech.


Anti-intellectualism has deteriorated the quality of political parties. The LDP has lost much of the width of perspectives and the sense of balance that the party used to have. Few voices of criticism arise from within the party against the Abe administration’s push for the security bills. It lacks next leaders who can step in to remedy a situation when Prime Minister Abe makes mistakes. This is a crisis both for the LDP and Japan.


On the other hand, a new wave of civic culture has certainly emerged and is spreading, triggered by the movement opposing the security legislation. In 1960, the attempt by Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi — Abe’s grandfather — to revise the Japan-U.S. security treaty met with large-scale protest movements. However, the culture of civic political movements then disappeared. It was only after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear crisis gave rise to the movement against nuclear power that citizens acquired the practice of taking to the streets on a daily basis to raise their voices on important policy issues. Civic political movements scaled down after the LDP returned to power but they continued. A new movement led by students has built on such forces to generate public opinion. The students in the movement are using emails and Line messages to expand their organizations and are successfully mobilizing thousands and tens of thousands of citizens in rallies around the Diet compound. Such actions by students have in turn led scholars to be ashamed of their own silence — with many of them starting to speak up against the security legislation and to express their opinions on other political issues, including their call on the government to clearly state Japan’s remorse and apology over its wartime aggression when Prime Minister Abe issues a statement marking the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II this summer.


Approval ratings of the Abe Cabinet in media opinion polls dropped sharply after the administration railroaded the security bills through the Lower House, falling from the level around 50 percent to less than 40 percent insome polls, while disapproval ratings surged in many polls to top approval figures.


Meanwhile, facing strong public criticism, Prime Minister Abe had no alternative but to scrap the controversial plan to build a new National Stadium — the main venue of the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo — at a massive cost of ¥250 billion, although an order for its construction had already been placed to a general contractor. People harbored a specific anger because the issue at stake was how taxpayer money will be used. The episode has proven that public opinion is not powerless against a government action.


In East Asia, pro-democracy movements began in the latter half of the 1980s, starting with the ones led by students in South Korea and Taiwan. Japan has long defined itself as a pioneer of democracy in Asia and supposedly viewed those movements in its neighbors in a favorable light. In reality, however, democracy in Japan has been confined to the system of political parties and parliament - which is just a form. It must be said that in fact Japan is right now following the democracy movements that started in its neighbors such as South Korea and is trying to create a new political culture of its own, Seventy years after the end of WWII, Japan’s political democracy is at a major crossroads. Will Japan, with egocentric anti-intellectualism and suspension of judgment, destroy the peace and stability built on its postwar democracy? Or will the new civic culture turn the nation into a more mature democracy? I only hope that the Japanese people will make a wise choice as we think of war and peace in the war anniversary month.

Jiro Yamaguchi is a professor of political science at Hosei University.


Japan Times, July 331


2015.08.03 Monday 17:53

長く暑い夏を作ろう

 七月三一日には、安保法制に反対する学者の会と、SEALD(自由と民主主義のための緊急学生行動)が共同で、集会とデモを行った。集会の中で学生が憲法と平和の大切さを切々と訴えるのを聞くと、涙が止まらなかった。先日、ある友人から六〇年安保の時の丸山真男先生たちが繰り広げた戦いは今引き継がれているとのメールをもらった時にも、涙が出てきた。年を取ると何かにつけてすぐ感激して、涙もろくなったようだ。

 ここは個人的な感懐に浸っている場合ではない。運動は自己満足のためではなく、安保法制を粉砕するためにしているのだ。暑い八月を迎えたが、闘いはこれからが正念場である。政府与党も相当慌てはじめた。自民党の関係者が学生を誹謗中傷するのも、自信のなさの現れである。

 参議院でも与党が過半数を持っており、採決に持ち込まれたら結果は見えている。数の力を振るわせないよう、審議を粘り強く続けさせなければならない。八月には戦争関連の行事がいくつもあり、原発再稼働も予想されている。安倍首相にとってはいばらの道である。

暑く長い夏を作り出し、安保法制なんて出すのではなかったと思わせてやろう。我々が最後に持っているのは世論という武器である。世論は政治家を縛る目に見えない鎖なのだ。


東京新聞8月2日


<<new | 1 / 146pages | old>>
 
RECOMMEND
CALENDAR
NEW ENTRY
ARCHIVES
CATEGORY
COMMENT
PROFILE
MOBILE
LINK
SEARCH
OTHER

(C) 2015 無料ブログ JUGEM Some Rights Reserved.